That Can’t be Good for You

jogger - vascular system

Have you heard this one from your family and friends? I have, but the research doesn’t support their concerns.

Many of my friends/family worry that ultrarunning is bad for my heart because it has to work for extended periods of time, like 36 hours, at an elevated rate. The research shows that there is short term stress (duh) but there are no long term negative effects on the heart. Overall, ultrarunner’s hearts are normal and often more healthy than the general population.

The most chronic ailments ultrarunners suffer from are allergies and exercise-induced asthma. On average, ultrarunners miss 2.2 days of work a year for illness. It’s 3.7 for the national average.  All those people concerned about your knees, tell them to rest easy the research doesn’t support that or damage to other joints or cartilage.  Yes, runners get injured. They pull muscles and tendons and sometimes they get a stress fracture. What athlete doesn’t get hurt at some point, even recreational athletes (aka not extreme)?

So ultrarunning is not bad for you. Perfect, that’s exactly what all ultrarunners wanted to hear, so we can look at our friends and family and roll our eyes. Then we walk into another room to sit down with our crew for the next 100 mile race. “Alright guys, you know how this goes. There is no quitting. I don’t care if I’m puking, peeing blood, have diarrhea, twisted an ankle, bloody from falling down. It doesn’t matter. I go until I cross the finish line.”

Sounds like optimal health status to me.

I’ve heard ultrarunners say they want to be healthy and they may have started running to be more healthy. Many of them eat well and take care of their bodies, but I believe it’s more of a taking care of the body to run 100 miles and not running 100 miles to take care of the body.

If it can get so tough out there, why do we do it over and over again? Because crossing the finish line of a 50 or 100 mile run is remarkable. The more difficult the race the more we love it. We earn ever belt buckle we have. We run into hell with a smile knowing it’s going to get hot, we’re going to get burned, and we’re going to want to die.

We do it because we refuse to believe we won’t come out on the other side. We stare down our demons, pull on the boxing gloves and go round after round after round. We’re fighters. When we get knocked down we get back up and keep going toward our goal.

The true benefits of running Ultras: mental fortitude and the belief that you can.

Never Surrender, Never Retreat.

Peeing Red

potty-dance

One of the more concerning problems I had during my most recent 100 mile event, was blood in my urine. I had never heard of anyone experiencing this particular issue. When I saw the blood at mile 50, I knew I had to make a decision and had four options: drop out of the race, walk and drink a lot of water, continue running and risk making it worse, or take a break and see if it clears up.

I chose to walk and drink a lot of water. It did clear up and I was able to finish the race, but struggled with nausea through the rest of the race. I had hydrated well before the race and I paid special attention to hydrating during the race, since I’ve had issues with hydrating before. I concluded it was the combination of dehydration and taking Aleve, for my hamstring. After the race, I decided to do some research to determine if I needed to go to the doctor.

Blood in your urine (hematuria) is not a common issue runner’s deal with, but it does happen in some runners. The typical causes of hematuria are infection, trauma, kidney stones, cancer, blood cell disorders, medications and strenuous exercise.

Doctors don’t know exactly what happens for there to be blood in a runner’s urine. They think it could have to do with dehydration, blood cell breakdown, or bladder trauma. There is a theory that if someone voids their bladder right before a strenuous run, the walls of the bladder slap together (disturbing thought) during the run and cause traumatic blood loss.

Blood can be present in the urine if the blood vessels surrounding a specialized membrane that helps filter blood and produce urine, if they become more permeable which can be caused during exercise.

Another potential cause is related to hemoglobin, which is red. The theory here is the impact of our feet on the ground while running damages blood cells and releases the hemoglobin which then gets filtered out through the urine.

In my search of potential causes, I found that this uncommon issue is not all that uncommon among ultrarunners and is typically related to hydration problems.

So if you have blood in your urine during or after a run, hydrate and don’t freak out. If it continues for more than 24-48 hours you should go to the doctor and get checked out.