The Ready of Ready, set, go!

run 100

Other than training, how do you get ready for a 100-mile run?

I can’t speak for everyone, but I’ll tell you how I prepare for a 100. First, you need to read all the rules on the website. Also on the website, the race director will tell you when or if you can have a pacer. A pacer is usually allowed after the first 50 miles. You want to find out what they will have at the aid stations as well. You will need to train with that stuff if you plan to use it during the race.

I start looking for pacers and crew shortly after I register for a 100. You will need to find people who are pretty tough because they may need to watch you continue even when you look like you could fall over. Not only that, they have to send you back out there when you want to quit. I take my training partners, friends, and my dad. I took my son once and he asked to never be asked again because he had such a hard time watching me continue when I was hurting.

The other thing I try to do is predict when I will be coming into each aid station. This does a few things. It helps me keep on track to hit all the cut offs and finish. It also lets my crew know when I will be coming into each aid station.

To do this, I create a table in Microsoft word. It has a column with each aid station’s name, the mile the aid station is at, whether or not I can have a drop bag at that aid station, whether or not I have access to my crew at that aid station, whether or not I can pick up a pacer at that aid station, the cut off time, and what time I expect to arrive at that point. I’ve included my most recent chart at the end.

I estimate my time to the aid station by experience, distance between aid stations, and the elevation profile of the race. I know that I slowdown in the last 40 miles both in my ascents and descents. So in those estimates, I try to be generous on my time frame.

Once I have times, I can plan my drop bags. I usually put a drop bag in every twenty miles. There are things I put in every drop bag such as stomach medication, blister first aid, food options that the race doesn’t provide, a long sleeve and short shirt, and two pairs of socks. In my night bags, I put in a head light and extra batteries, long pants, gloves, and an extra long sleeve shirt. In my day bags, I have sunscreen and my long sleeve shirts are lighter in color usually white. There are things I leave with my crew too. My trekking poles, extra shoes, extra food, clothing for rain, extreme cold and snow, and pedialyte.

I have my crew at every aid station possible, unless they can’t get to the race until after I start. I really need them there after mile 50. Sure I could do the race without a crew, but it’s so nice to have a someone you know there to help you do whatever you need them to do. The aid station crew will help, but if they are not experienced ultrarunners, they can’t help you much when you are really struggling.

A pacer is helpful because they can keep your pace up when you are tired and hurting. They work as a distraction and encouragement. They can help find your drop bag and dig through it searching for what you need. They can massage aching muscles and help you change clothes and shoes when are off balance. They help you stay on the right trail. They CANNOT carry any of your gear.

My pacers do anywhere between 20-30 miles depending on their experience as a runner. I don’t want my pacer to slow down. Nor do I want them to have stomach issues, blisters, or anything else that will impact my race, so choose pacers wisely and don’t use them beyond their experience.

The final thing I do is have a crew/pacer meeting. At the meeting, I cover the possible weather, all the above information, and any strange behave I predictably have during a race such as I get really tired during the hours of 4-6 am but come back once the sun comes up. I also cover how they need to prepare. They need their own food, running gear especially for the weather conditions we expect to see. They need to be able to entertain themselves for hours while waiting for me to come in. How they can address problems that I am having and encourage me to keep going.

The bottom line is you really need to be prepared for every possibility because these races tend to be in remote areas where you cannot easily get something you forgot to pack or suddenly NEED to have. You do need to figure out where you can go to get stuff if really really really needed.

In my elation, I neglected to tell you I was accepted in to the Bear 100! At the beginning of this year the Bear was my goal race. In March, I found out it was full so I put my name on the wait list. Low and Behold, I got in and just found out a few weeks ago.

Bear 100

Where mile Crew allowed Drop bag allowed Cut off Pacer allowed Expected time in Ascent

From last aid

Start

Hyrum Gibbons

1400 E 350 S

0

10. 5 to next aid

Yes Yes   No 6:00 a.m.  
Logan Peak 10.52

9 to next aid

No No   No 11: 00 a.m. 4600
Leatham Hollow 19.66

3 to next aid

Yes Yes   No 1:30 p.m. 300
Richards Hollow 22.50

7.5 to next aid

Yes No   No 230 pm 200
Cowley Canyon 29.98

7 to next aid

Yes Yes   No 5 pm 2100
Right Hand Fork 36.92

9 to next aid

Yes Yes   Yes

Robert

7 pm 800
Temple Fork 45.15

6.5 to next aid

Yes Yes   Yes

Robert

830 pm 1100
Tony Grove

5$ fee

51.84

8.5 to next aid

Yes Yes 7:00 a.m Saturday Yes

Robert

10 30 p.m. 2700
Franklin Trailhead 61.48

7 to next aid

Yes Yes 9:00 a.m.

Saturday

Yes

Robert

1 30 a.m. 900
Logan River/Steep 68.6

7.5 to next aid

Yes No 11:00 a.m.

Saturday

Yes

Change to Steve

3 a.m. 1350
Beaver Lodge 75.82

5.5 to next aid

Yes Yes 12:30 p.m.

Saturday

Yes

Change to Erin

6 a.m. 1500
Gibson Basin 81.18

4 to next aid

No No 2:00 p.m.

Saturday

Yes

Erin

730 a.m. 200
Beaver Creek CG 85.25

7 to next aid

Yes Yes 3:00 p.m.

Saturday

Yes

Erin

9:30 a.m. 1200
Ranger Dip 92.2

8 miles to finish

Yes Yes 4:30 p.m.

Saturday

Yes 11:30 a.m. 600
Finish 99.7 Yes Yes 6:00 p.m. Yes 3:30 pm. All down hill

 

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